Peak District and UK Weather Peak District and UK Weather

Climate Change

This page will provide data and comments about Climate Change. Statistics and graphs will be displayed using visualisations, mainly produced in Microsoft Power BI, by utilising data provided by the Met Office, via their main CET datasets.
The CET graph at the top of the page will be updated periodically and the data is up to date as of June 2019.

Central England Temperature (CET)

Power BI line graph of the CET dataset CET average monthly temperatures shown above, from the year 1659 to 2019 with average and trend lines, through the whole dataset. The data starts in the depths of the Little Ice Age (LIA), and the upward trend is due to warming from the second half of the 19th century. The most recent severe cold or heavy snow years of 1963 and 1947 are difficult to identify in the data because the cold years of the previous 300 years, pale the recent years into insignificance - as indicated by the high and low averages. Also the recent warm years of this the 21st century, are not that much warmer than ten or so years from the centuries past.


CET Summer Months Averages

Power BI line graph of the CET Summer Average temperatures CET average summer months temperatures shown above, from the year 1659 to 2019 with average and trend lines, through the whole dataset. There are 360 years of data above and very little rise is apparent in the summer months averages, i.e. June, July, August. Approximately a 0.3 or 0.4 deg c rise over the centuries. The change shown above for Summer months is negligible and the rise in annual average temperature must therefore be mainly from other seasons of the year.

CET Winter Months Averages

Power BI line graph of the CET Winter Average temperatures CET average winter months temperatures shown above, from the year 1659 to 2019 with a trend line through the whole dataset. There are 360 years of data above and a greater rise than the CET summer temperatures, is apparent, in the winter months averages, i.e. December, January, February - approximately a 1.5 deg c rise over the centuries. Over this long period, i.e. 3.5 centuries, there is bound to be change, with this dataset starting in the depths of the LIA and also covering the Maunder Minimum, when the Sun's activity was very low. There are three notable cold winters, 1868, 1739 and 1962 - these particular winters were exceptionally cold for months on end.
As this dataset only covers a triangular area of central England, the cold conditions of the Northern hills, Welsh and Scotland Mountains are hard to imagine.

CET from 1988 to 2018

Power BI area graph of the CET from 1988 to 2018 CET yearly average temperatures shown above, over a 30 year period, from the year 1988 to 2018 with a trend line through the whole dataset. The rise (approximately 0.1 deg c) in CET over the last 30 years in barely discernable.

CET Warmest Seasons

Power BI scatter graph of the CET Warmest Season temperatures CET warmest season temperatures shown above in a scatter chart, from the year 1659 to 2019. There are 360 years of data above and when you examine the data, the average temperatures of the warmest seasons from the last 360 years have not risen that much. The warmest summers to do not seem to have become any warmer, Springs and Autumns are warmer. Frequency of the warmest seasons increases from about 1990. The chart is produced by averaging the seasons, and taking the Top 20 for each season through the whole dataset.

A Description of the CET

The CET is the longest dataset of recorded land temperatures, taken at three locations in England. The locations are situated in a triangle across Central England, at Stonyhurst (Lancashire), Pershore (Worcestershire) and Rothamsted (Hertfordshire). There are monthly averages from 1659 and daily averages from 1772. The Met Office have adjusted the data by -0.2 deg since 1974, to allow for the UHI effect on the three sites.

Seasons Legend


Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence. ref Parker, D.E., T.P. Legg, and C.K. Folland. 1992. A new daily Central England Temperature Series, 1772-1991. Int. J. Clim., Vol 12, pp 317-342 (PDF)